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Sustainable jet fuel

The Future Farm Industries CRC Sustainable Mallee Jet Fuel project assessed the environmental, social and economic sustainability of growing mallee biomass in south-western Australia and converting that biomass to jet fuel.

There were two parts to the study:

The ‘sustainability assessment’ – which assessed the sustainability of the proposed value chain (from ‘farm to fly’) according to Roundtable for Sustainable Biofuels (RSB) principles, with an assumed level of farmer participation and new processing throughput.

The ‘life cycle assessment’ (LCA) – which compared potential greenhouse gas emissions, cumulative energy demand and fossil fuel depletion with and without mallee cropping and processing.

The project was commissioned by Airbus, collaborating with an existing consortium formed to promote R&D on mallee biomass-to-jet fuel in Australia. The consortium was comprised of Virgin Australia, GE, Renewable Oil Corporation, Dynamotive Energy Systems Corporation and Future Farm Industries CRC.

This first step assessment could prove to be a stepping stone to a large-scale commercial venture of direct benefit to the aviation industry, Australian farmers, regional economies and the environment.

More information:

Download the full report - 'Mallee jet fuel sustainability and life-cycle assessment'.

Download the four-page flyer of the project: 'Mallee Jet Fuel at Perth Airport 2021'.

Read the media release from the report launch.

Contact:

Dr John McGrath, Future Farm Industries CRC

 





 

Further Information

 
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Future Farm Industries Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) ceased trading on 30 June 2014.

This website contains information about the CRC’s research into perennial plant based farming systems.

This site will remain live until 30 June 2017 but is no longer being updated or reviewed.

Further information about CRC research projects can be obtained by following links from relevant project pages or by viewing the research transfer page.

The CRC was funded for seven years (2007-2014) under the Australian Government Cooperative Research Centre program.